23 Things programme, Thing 2 (blogging)

This week in 23ThingsEdUni, I’ll be getting situated to the 23ThingsEdUni programme (Thing 1) and starting up up my blog (Thing 2).

My responses to this week’s prompts:

A) what you hope to gain out of the 23 Things programme.

I’ve been keen to do the 23 Things programme for some time now. I’ve always been attracted to opportunities for practical professional development. Although I am familiar with some of the things of the 23 Things List (e.g. Twitter, Facebook), but unfamiliar with a lot of other things (e.g. Copyright, Augmented & Virtual Reality, Wikimedia). I’ve been thinking a lot about using social media and digital tools more mindfully and with intention, so I saw this self-directed course as an opportunity to provide myself with a weekly time to dedicate to review, reflect and experiment with different tools. I am also doing the programme alongside a set of other PhD students, which I think will be invaluable to the experience–both in that we are having a shared experience, but also providing one another with diverse perspectives and interpretations of how a tool is beneficial (or not) for our personal workflow. Lastly, I’ve been trying to get into a blogging and into a weekly writing habit for a long time, so I see this course as an opportunity to develop that habit.

B) were you aware of the University’s Social Media Guidelines for Staff and Researchers or the student Social Media Student Handbook? What do you think of the guidelines/handbook?

I am not affiliated with University of Edinburgh, but I did have a read through the document. I appreciate that there is some formal procedures to consider, though nothing jumped out at me that was particularly alarming. I’m based at the University of Melbourne, so I did some poking around there and came across this: https://students.unimelb.edu.au/explore/appropriate-behaviour/social-media I have seen a lot of professional development upskilling workshops at the Uni aroun social media, but none have explored any guidelines with much depth. I am a frequent user of Twitter and recently came to manage my Centre’s social media platforms, so when I have some time later this week, I think it is worth looking into more closely, to make sure I don’t get myself into any trouble. At the very least, I can use the University of Edinburgh’s guidelines as a template for my behaviour and code of conduct when using social media!

Ciao for now–I’ll check in within the week to update any additional guidelines or knowledge I find from UniMelb re: social media policy!

m.

23 Things programme, Thing 2 (blogging)

A Literature Review (in process)

I am participating in the course on ‘How to Do a Literature Review’, an open online course running on the FutureLearn platform. I plan to use this space to record my learning throughout the four weeks to see the development of my literature review for the introductory chapter of my dissertation and share my own experience. All of this is a work-in-progress/thinking in progress and I am testing out this whole blogging thing, in combination with trying to combine meet some of my writing goals. In the off-chance that you’re reading this, and have any interest in what I am proposing, I of course, welcome your feedback!

Week 1: The topic I’ve chosen for my literature review is the processes of motivation for physical activity for people with osteoarthritis. At the moment, I am trying to figure out if the literature review will serve as a true “Introduction” to my dissertation. Originally, I was going to use the literature review to provide an overview of the public health significance and motivation for the current research on motivating people with osteoarthritis to be physically active. (e.g.discuss the benefits of physical activity; note the difference in physical activity levels for people with osteoarthritis (OA) (in comparison to healthy population); review the burden of OA (worldwide), and describe the benefits of engaging in physical activity for people with OA.)

I think in order to conclude with a review of each of my dissertation chapters, I have to include a discussion and analysis of motivation for physical activity for people with OA. I had initially conceptualized this as my second chapter (A critical review of the barriers and facilitators (and ?behaviour change theories) used in physical activity interventions for people with osteoarthritis) but the more I participate in the course, the more I’m realising that this “second” chapter should be included as part of the introduction because it provides the context for why I am completing my dissertation.

Here’s what I have currently presented as my initial focus statement.

Physical activity decreases pain and increases physical function for people with osteoarthritis (OA), however most people with OA do not meet recommended physical activity guidelines. If there are clear benefits to engaging in physical activity, why aren’t more people in this population motivated to be active? Existing models of behavior change for physical activity for people with osteoarthritis commonly focus on barriers and facilitators that require deliberate reasoning, however, recent findings suggest that non-conscious processes also drive health behavior. In this dissertation, I use the dual process theory and reflective-impulsive model to explore the relationship between reflective and nonconscious processes to broaden our understanding of motivation for physical activity for people with OA. I use this theory-driven approach in combination with survey data and best-worst discrete choice experiments to inform the development a pilot randomized controlled trial that assesses the acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility and implementation costs and preliminary efficacy of a physical activity intervention that considers both implicit and explicit processes of motivation for physical activity in people with OA.

I plan to include the following components in my introduction/critical literature review 
AIM 1: To provide an overview of the public health significance and motivation for the current research on motivating people with osteoarthritis to be physically active
AIM 2: To synthesise the existing body of research on the barriers, facilitators and correlates of physical activity for people with osteoarthritis
AIM 3: To propose a measurement model in the area of physical activity for adults with osteoarthritis
AIM 4: To compare and contrast the COM-B model for physical activity on healthy adults with the proposed measurement model
(tentative) AIM 5: To identify behavior change theories that are used to promote physical activity for adults with osteoarthritis

A Literature Review (in process)

A Literature Review (in process)

I am participating in the course on ‘How to Do a Literature Review’, an open online course running on the FutureLearn platform. I plan to use this space to record my learning throughout the four weeks to see the development of my literature review for the introductory chapter of my dissertation and share my own experience. All of this is a work-in-progress/thinking in progress and I am testing out this whole blogging thing, in combination with trying to combine meet some of my writing goals. In the off-chance that you’re reading this, and have any interest in what I am proposing, I of course, welcome your feedback!

Week 1: The topic I’ve chosen for my literature review is the processes of motivation for physical activity for people with osteoarthritis. At the moment, I am trying to figure out if the literature review will serve as a true “Introduction” to my dissertation. Originally, I was going to use the literature review to provide an overview of the public health significance and motivation for the current research on motivating people with osteoarthritis to be physically active. (e.g.discuss the benefits of physical activity; note the difference in physical activity levels for people with osteoarthritis (OA) (in comparison to healthy population); review the burden of OA (worldwide), and describe the benefits of engaging in physical activity for people with OA.)

I think in order to conclude with a review of each of my dissertation chapters, I have to include a discussion and analysis of motivation for physical activity for people with OA. I had initially conceptualized this as my second chapter (A critical review of the barriers and facilitators (and ?behaviour change theories) used in physical activity interventions for people with osteoarthritis) but the more I participate in the course, the more I’m realising that this “second” chapter should be included as part of the introduction because it provides the context for why I am completing my dissertation.

Here’s what I have currently presented as my initial focus statement.

Physical activity decreases pain and increases physical function for people with osteoarthritis (OA), however most people with OA do not meet recommended physical activity guidelines. If there are clear benefits to engaging in physical activity, why aren’t more people in this population motivated to be active? Existing models of behavior change for physical activity for people with osteoarthritis commonly focus on barriers and facilitators that require deliberate reasoning, however, recent findings suggest that non-conscious processes also drive health behavior. In this dissertation, I use the dual process theory and reflective-impulsive model to explore the relationship between reflective and nonconscious processes to broaden our understanding of motivation for physical activity for people with OA. I use this theory-driven approach in combination with survey data and best-worst discrete choice experiments to inform the development a pilot randomized controlled trial that assesses the acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility and implementation costs and preliminary efficacy of a physical activity intervention that considers both implicit and explicit processes of motivation for physical activity in people with OA.

I plan to include the following components in my introduction/critical literature review 
AIM 1: To provide an overview of the public health significance and motivation for the current research on motivating people with osteoarthritis to be physically active
AIM 2: To synthesise the existing body of research on the barriers, facilitators and correlates of physical activity for people with osteoarthritis
AIM 3: To propose a measurement model in the area of physical activity for adults with osteoarthritis
AIM 4: To compare and contrast the COM-B model for physical activity on healthy adults with the proposed measurement model
(tentative) AIM 5: To identify behavior change theories that are used to promote physical activity for adults with osteoarthritis

A Literature Review (in process)